Lookup.cs source code in C# .NET

Source code for the .NET framework in C#

                        

Code:

/ 4.0 / 4.0 / DEVDIV_TFS / Dev10 / Releases / RTMRel / ndp / fx / src / Core / System / Linq / Parallel / Utils / Lookup.cs / 1305376 / Lookup.cs

                            // ==++== 
//
//   Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
//
// ==--== 
// =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
// 
// Lookup.cs 
//
// [....] 
//
// =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

using System.Collections; 
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics.Contracts; 
 
namespace System.Linq.Parallel
{ 
    /// 
    /// Lookup class implements the ILookup interface. Lookup is very similar to a dictionary
    /// except multiple values are allowed to map to the same key, and null keys are supported.
    /// 
    /// Support for null keys adds an issue because the Dictionary class Lookup uses for
    /// storage does not support null keys. So, we need to treat null keys separately. 
    /// Unfortunately, since TKey may be a value type, we cannot test whether the key is null 
    /// using the user-specified equality comparer.
    /// 
    /// C# does allow us to compare the key against null using the == operator, but there is a
    /// possibility that the user's equality comparer considers null to be equal to other values.
    /// Now, MSDN documentation specifies that if IEqualityComparer.Equals(x,y) returns true, it
    /// must be the case that x and y have the same hash code, and null has no hash code. Despite 
    /// that, we might as well support the use case, even if it is bad practice.
    /// 
    /// The solution the Lookup class uses is to treat the key default(TKey) as a special case, 
    /// and hold its associated grouping - if any - in a special field instead of inserting it
    /// into a dictionary. 
    /// 
    /// 
    /// 
    internal class Lookup : ILookup 
    {
        private IDictionary> m_dict; 
        private IEqualityComparer m_comparer; 
        private IGrouping m_defaultKeyGrouping = null;
 
        internal Lookup(IEqualityComparer comparer)
        {
            m_comparer = comparer;
            m_dict = new Dictionary>(m_comparer); 
        }
 
        public int Count 
        {
            get 
            {
                int count = m_dict.Count;
                if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
                { 
                    count++;
                } 
 
                return count;
            } 
        }

        // Returns an empty sequence if the key is not in the lookup.
        public IEnumerable this[TKey key] 
        {
            get 
            { 
                if (m_comparer.Equals(key, default(TKey)))
                { 
                    if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
                    {
                        return m_defaultKeyGrouping;
                    } 

                    return Enumerable.Empty(); 
                } 
                else
                { 
                    IGrouping grouping;
                    if (m_dict.TryGetValue(key, out grouping))
                    {
                        return grouping; 
                    }
 
                    return Enumerable.Empty(); 
                }
            } 
        }

        public bool Contains(TKey key)
        { 
            if (m_comparer.Equals(key, default(TKey)))
            { 
                return m_defaultKeyGrouping != null; 
            }
            else 
            {
                return m_dict.ContainsKey(key);
            }
        } 

        // 
        // Adds a grouping to the lookup 
        //
        // Note: The grouping should be cheap to enumerate (IGrouping extends IEnumerable), as 
        // it may be enumerated multiple times depending how the user manipulates the lookup.
        // Our code must guarantee that we never attempt to insert two groupings with the same
        // key into a lookup.
        // 

        internal void Add(IGrouping grouping) 
        { 
            if (m_comparer.Equals(grouping.Key, default(TKey)))
            { 
                Contract.Assert(m_defaultKeyGrouping == null, "Cannot insert two groupings with the default key into a lookup.");

                m_defaultKeyGrouping = grouping;
            } 
            else
            { 
                Contract.Assert(!m_dict.ContainsKey(grouping.Key)); 

                m_dict.Add(grouping.Key, grouping); 
            }
        }

        public IEnumerator> GetEnumerator() 
        {
            // First iterate over the groupings in the dictionary, and then over the default-key 
            // grouping, if there is one. 

            foreach (IGrouping grouping in m_dict.Values) 
            {
                yield return grouping;
            }
 
            if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
            { 
                yield return m_defaultKeyGrouping; 
            }
        } 

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return ((IEnumerable>)this).GetEnumerator(); 
        }
    } 
} 

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
// ==++== 
//
//   Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
//
// ==--== 
// =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
// 
// Lookup.cs 
//
// [....] 
//
// =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

using System.Collections; 
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics.Contracts; 
 
namespace System.Linq.Parallel
{ 
    /// 
    /// Lookup class implements the ILookup interface. Lookup is very similar to a dictionary
    /// except multiple values are allowed to map to the same key, and null keys are supported.
    /// 
    /// Support for null keys adds an issue because the Dictionary class Lookup uses for
    /// storage does not support null keys. So, we need to treat null keys separately. 
    /// Unfortunately, since TKey may be a value type, we cannot test whether the key is null 
    /// using the user-specified equality comparer.
    /// 
    /// C# does allow us to compare the key against null using the == operator, but there is a
    /// possibility that the user's equality comparer considers null to be equal to other values.
    /// Now, MSDN documentation specifies that if IEqualityComparer.Equals(x,y) returns true, it
    /// must be the case that x and y have the same hash code, and null has no hash code. Despite 
    /// that, we might as well support the use case, even if it is bad practice.
    /// 
    /// The solution the Lookup class uses is to treat the key default(TKey) as a special case, 
    /// and hold its associated grouping - if any - in a special field instead of inserting it
    /// into a dictionary. 
    /// 
    /// 
    /// 
    internal class Lookup : ILookup 
    {
        private IDictionary> m_dict; 
        private IEqualityComparer m_comparer; 
        private IGrouping m_defaultKeyGrouping = null;
 
        internal Lookup(IEqualityComparer comparer)
        {
            m_comparer = comparer;
            m_dict = new Dictionary>(m_comparer); 
        }
 
        public int Count 
        {
            get 
            {
                int count = m_dict.Count;
                if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
                { 
                    count++;
                } 
 
                return count;
            } 
        }

        // Returns an empty sequence if the key is not in the lookup.
        public IEnumerable this[TKey key] 
        {
            get 
            { 
                if (m_comparer.Equals(key, default(TKey)))
                { 
                    if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
                    {
                        return m_defaultKeyGrouping;
                    } 

                    return Enumerable.Empty(); 
                } 
                else
                { 
                    IGrouping grouping;
                    if (m_dict.TryGetValue(key, out grouping))
                    {
                        return grouping; 
                    }
 
                    return Enumerable.Empty(); 
                }
            } 
        }

        public bool Contains(TKey key)
        { 
            if (m_comparer.Equals(key, default(TKey)))
            { 
                return m_defaultKeyGrouping != null; 
            }
            else 
            {
                return m_dict.ContainsKey(key);
            }
        } 

        // 
        // Adds a grouping to the lookup 
        //
        // Note: The grouping should be cheap to enumerate (IGrouping extends IEnumerable), as 
        // it may be enumerated multiple times depending how the user manipulates the lookup.
        // Our code must guarantee that we never attempt to insert two groupings with the same
        // key into a lookup.
        // 

        internal void Add(IGrouping grouping) 
        { 
            if (m_comparer.Equals(grouping.Key, default(TKey)))
            { 
                Contract.Assert(m_defaultKeyGrouping == null, "Cannot insert two groupings with the default key into a lookup.");

                m_defaultKeyGrouping = grouping;
            } 
            else
            { 
                Contract.Assert(!m_dict.ContainsKey(grouping.Key)); 

                m_dict.Add(grouping.Key, grouping); 
            }
        }

        public IEnumerator> GetEnumerator() 
        {
            // First iterate over the groupings in the dictionary, and then over the default-key 
            // grouping, if there is one. 

            foreach (IGrouping grouping in m_dict.Values) 
            {
                yield return grouping;
            }
 
            if (m_defaultKeyGrouping != null)
            { 
                yield return m_defaultKeyGrouping; 
            }
        } 

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return ((IEnumerable>)this).GetEnumerator(); 
        }
    } 
} 

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
                        

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